The Taser's Edge


Tuesday Reading Roundup 10: Madeleine L’Engle Edition

1. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle–Already read it way back when.  Read it again, and it is fabulous.  Far better than Philip Pullman’s Golden Compass/His Dark Materials series.  I think I’m going to have some kids just so I can read it with/to them.  I have mixed feelings about the fact that it seems unfilmable (despite the existence of at least one cinematic attempt).  Disappointed, because more people would get to know L’Engle’s creation.  Kind of glad, though, because I can pretend it’s my little secret, despite the fact that it won the Newbery Medal, sold millions of copies, and is read in classrooms across America.  Also, check out this 3-d image of a 5-d tesseract (those of you in the know know):

2. A Wind in the Door by Madeleine L’Engle–So I’m hooked and also already read this one, too.  Three cheers for kything and farondalae!  But I have to wonder at the lack of tesseraction.

3. A Swiftly Tilting Planet by Madeleine L’Engle–Third in the series, it is in my sights this week.  For some reason, while the first two books are shelved in the children’s section at Durham Downtown Library, this one is in the Young Adult section.  I assume it must have frank, sexual discussion or a teenage angst-filled Charles Wallace.  (Holden Caulfield plus telepathy: a deadly cocktail.)  Maybe after I read all the Madeleine L’Engle that exists, I’ll return to Lloyd Alexander’s Prydain as well.

4. Great Lent by Alexander Schmemann–I think you’ve heard of it by now.  I couldn’t swear to having read a single page last week.

5. Batman: The Dark Knight Returns by Frank MillerIn my three years as a graduate student at Duke, I have only requested that Duke buy two books.  (You know Duke has some serious money, since this is an option, despite the fact that most books people want are at least available through Inter-Library Loan.)  And the two books are…<drum pum pum pum roll>…this one and Batman: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore, the two comics most responsible for the Heath Ledger version of the Joker in The Dark Knight.  At least I know that a collections librarian is one person on this earth who has no room to judge me for my nerdiness.  Then there’s the fact that I only thought about requesting that Duke buy it after my friend Dave successfully requested that Duke buy the second half of the third season of Entourage (which, I will admit, is a darn good show by that point in its run).

6. Helping People Forgive by David W. Augsburger–Haven’t started it yet, but the title sounds descriptive.  The readings for Acolatse’s Marriage and Family class are amazing this week.  Christian healing and forgiveness, non-violent communication of anger, getting the local church to start talking/dealing with sexual abuse.  Terrific articles.

7. Random stuff from Kant, specifically his discussion of virtue.

Truly I’m back from Spring Break.  And truly I am checked out even more than ever.  Addicted to graphic novels, children’s novels, and computer games from my childhood.  My friend Samara told me today that we have 5 weeks of classes left.  Let’s see, on my schedule that makes…15 days of classes left.  Not going to help me stay involved.  I just need to divert my energy toward constructivity around the house instead of toward my ancient English civilization (which is now building railroads in 400AD, while destroying the Aztec and American civilizations simultaneously).

And then there’s my Application for Holy Orders.  It’s less fun than it sounds.



Lenten Devotion 1.2.2–Letting Go
March 7, 2009, 4:49 pm
Filed under: Bible, Life, Religion, Spirituality, Theology | Tags: , , ,

Letting Go: I don’t particularly like this terminology.  Schmemann talks about the possibility for a poverty of meaning and experience of God in Lent when we talk in terms of ‘taking up’ and ‘letting go’, because we can become so focused on the practices themselves that sight is lost of the reason for those practices.    Hopefully I’m avoiding that process, as I’m truly interested in being obedient to God in my Lenten disciplines.

1. Control–Giving up control.  What does that mean?  For me, the explanation is connected to how taking up spiritual disciplines is more natural to me than giving things up.  In my mind, taking control pushes away the feelings of chaos and anxiety and fear that I sometimes experience, but I think control is often an illusion which we buy into to make us feel more secure.  Disciplines come fairly easy to me, at least in comparison to most other Christians that I talk to.  But control quickly becomes not the fruit of the Spirit named as ‘self-control’ but the desire to control all kinds of circumstances which are beyond my control or my charge.  In short, ‘control’ is a type of worry.  I don’t need to worry, and I certainly don’t need or want to deal with more anxiety in my life.  So screw you, physiological, genetic, hereditary, etc. dispositions to anxiety.  I’m not in control, and that’s a good thing.

The practice of letting go of control is a practice of mindfulness, a constant, gentle, internal release of my claim over other things and even over myself.  Through this I come to see how little control I really hold.  This is not a fearful realization of abandonment to Fate (as much as it seems that it might be), but a realization of freedom, because a loving, redeeming God is cradling my whimpering, helpless form to his breast.  For me, the thought of being in charge, of being responsible for all those things around me is fear-inducing, even panic-inducing.  Also, I waste so much time, along with physical and psychic energy, on trying to control things that I both cannot control and which do not actually matter (trying to be on time to church, for one instance).  Finally, giving up control does battle with my perfectionism, and that battle is almost always a good thing, when done right.

2. Eating meat on M-W-F.  Finally, something that’s tangible.  It’s surprising, considering how little meat I usually eat (and how often my acquaintances assume I’m a vegetarian), how often this has already gotten in my way.  I’m just now thinking about meals on this coming Friday for Anglican Missional Pastor and whether there will be vegetarian options.  For all those vegetarians out there who have shown up at church potlucks and other social get-togethers only to have to skip every dish but the macaroni and cheese and the dessert tables, sorry I’m complaining.  But I do actually wonder if it would have been easier to just say “no meat for Lent.”  That way, I wouldn’t have to remember what day of the week it is.  I am certain that I will forget soon.  Also, I never craved meat before, and now I do.  On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays.

Please converse with me on all this.  And have a happy solemn Lent!.



Lent Thoughts 1.2.1–Taking Up

I’ve been meaning to do this post everyday since Lent began.  And now it’s here.  I was feeling a bit odd about publishing my Lenten commitments.  It’s my non-Lenty past, I think.  Still playing on repeat the verse I talked about on Ash Wednesday in the back of my mind (Matthew 6 about prayer and fasting and giving alms in secret).

There’s another stream in my mind, however, and I think it came from Duke.  This second stream is the communal focus.  That is, self-examination is one thing, and it has its place.  But the work that God does in us, the process through which God saves and makes us holy and whole is accomplished with the help of others.  Not because God couldn’t do it any other way, but because God seems to want to do it that way, or so the church has discerned for centuries.  God wants us to need each other and to live with each other (and in one another’s ‘personal’ space and  on one another’s personal toes).  So I write these publicly so you can get on my toes and in my space (because a lot of it’s your space too), ask me questions about whether these somewhat weird things actually make a difference, and just plain hold me to these commitments.  I also think writing this post has something to do with practicing Taking Up #2 (see below).

Taking Up: Adding new things to my spiritual life is much more natural to who I am.  I like spiritual disciplines, perhaps just because they make me feel like I’m doing something worthwhile with myself and with my time.  This year, the things I added have as much to do with cultivating my mental health as cultivating my Christian character (and I really don’t believe that those two things are any longer separable in me).

1. Gratitude/Thankfulness–Lots of self-help/psychology/spirituality books prefer the first term, possibly because many of them are coming out of a Buddhist or other not particularly theistic (or at least not believing in a personal, loving, intervening-in-history-and-our-lives God) worldview.  For me, taking up the practice of gratitude is the other side of the thankfulness coin.  Gratitude is the manner in which I receive, and thankfulness is honoring the One from whom I receive.  Both gratitude and thankfulness mean that I truly pay attention to and enjoy what I have been given.  It is a different way of seeing the world.  The practice of gratitude/thankfulness quickly runs over into the practice of enjoying, or finding enjoyment, in everything around me.  Some of you know how serious I can be or seem to be, how much I sometimes need to remember what it’s like (and how important it is for my overall health) to play, how much I need to enjoy (and stop all this darn thinking).  I’m working on it.

2. Generosity–Although I certainly look up to other people for being more generous monetarily than I am (I’m thinking of my brother Zack and my friend Dave as particularly good models), I think that for me that way of being generous needs to come out of a different kind of personal generosity.  When I say that I want to practice generosity during Lent, I mean that I want to be more generous with myself.  I want to be more free in giving myself to God, to other people, and to myself.  All of these things involve personal risk, and that is something which I want to step forward into, as uncomfortable as it is.  I’m thinking of my CPE interns group from last semester and the CPE residents group which I will begin meeting with in June.  I’m thinking of my small group from church.  When I offer of myself generously, other people are freed to offer of themselves generously.  Everyone experiences freedom.

This, of course, also has to do with offering grace and forgiveness.  Personally, while I certainly can use some work on even admitting that I get angry at God (which I do–hoppin’ mad at times), let alone offering God the graciousness that God continually gives me; and while forgiveness of other people always takes some time and effort (and especially time…and effort), my unforgiveness is mostly focused inwardly.  If I were as quick to forgive myself as I am to forgive people who wrong me, I would be in a much better place mentally and spiritually.  So, I’m hoping that generosity will bring healing in several ways.

3. A Penitential Order: Rite II (p. 351 in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer)–It hasn’t been clear yet, but I am trying to practice all of these things everyday.  Still having trouble figuring out what that means with the first two, other than trying to purposely be generous and thankful a handful of times each day.  With this third commitment, it’s easier to know what I mean.  Each day I have been using this order as my morning prayer.  I’ll usually add a Gospel reading or something to it, but this liturgy forms the core of my morning devotions.  I’m intending to copy it out into the next post, so you can see what it is.  One thing that has been very powerful for me is in seeing how reading and meditating on the Decalogue (the Ten Commandments) can actually be a very real way in which God goes to work on my life.  I have always found it a bit weird that Christians still make a big deal out of the Ten Commandments, but submitting to this practice has helped me to begin to see how much worth there is in having our hearts investigated by the Spirit through them.



Tuesday Reading Roundup, Week 8

1. Cane by Jean Toomer–The back of the book quotes somebody saying, “Cane is an important American Novel.”  Personally, at just over half way through, it may well be great, but I’m pretty sure it’s not a novel.  Unless I’m missing something, which is possible, it’s more of a series of prose and poetry vignettes.  I began reading it months ago, and stopped in the middle.  I would like to finish it.  We shall see.  Spring “Reading Week” (Duke insists on not calling it Spring Break) is next week after all.

2. Great Lent by Alexander Schmemann–Still plugging away at it.  Marvelous book, but I have nowhere in my normal scheduling to place a book which is neither wholly for pleasure nor for school, and it’s getting to the point that the tag cloud to the right of my site is making it seem like I read a ton of Schmemann.  Not the case, visitors.  I have read very little of him over a very long period of time.  That cloud is also over-the-top with Hauerwas.  I’ve read less than a book by him, too.  Y’all will be hearing from Schmemann throughout Lent, just as I seem to be.

3. Getting the Love You Want by Harville Hendrix–I was supposed to have read the first half for last week and then to finish it off for this week.  Clearly neither of those things is going to happen.  But, the tiny bit I have read is quite interesting.  The guy actually is a trained psychologist, after all.  That’s Harville Hendrix, Ph.D. to you.

4. The Lady, Her Lover, and Her Lord by T.D. Jakes–I said last week that I was surprised by how much I liked the book.  That ended at about 35 pages in.  Questionable biblical exegesis, overly conservative gender assumptions and gender role assignments, and terrible prose.  That’s not to say that there aren’t good points in it, because there are many of them.  And I’m still not finished with it yet.  I have to write a review on this or Hendrix’s book for Wednesday.

5. Upside Down: The Paradox of Servant Leadership by Stacy T. Rinehart–Rinehart (surprise: he’s a dude) is coming to speak at this month’s Anglican Missional Pastor training thing, at which I have to preach.  Eep.  At least if I don’t like his book and he doesn’t like my sermon, it will be a nice trade-off.  Self-psychoanalytical moment: Why would I be approaching this book with such a negative attitude?  For one, the president of Moody Bible Institute provides praise on the back.  What has Duke done to me?  I never even slightly considered Moody myself, but I have been good friends with a couple really good people who went there, and I never used to despise that brand of Christian conservatism.  It (this stance in me) is ideological, and I don’t like it.  And now returning to Tuesday Reading Roundup…I do have some hope–I’ve had good luck with the couple NavPress books that I’ve read, this book is with NavPress, and Rinehart was a vice president with the Navigators as of the writing of the autobiographical blurb.

6. Supreme: The Story of the Year by Alan Moore–This one’s as close to a normal superhero comic as I’ve read since I got a free issue of X-Men at BagelFest as a kid (actually, it might have been Zack’s issue, and I think it talked about the importance of recycling), or perhaps that Power Team comic in which they fought a gang with lots of paperclips in their faces, and in which the Power Team won over evil by wielding a bulletproof Bible (the same version, The Sword, that the Power Team would sell you).  Anyway, that’s not to say that it’s normal at all.  Apparently Supreme was an existing superhero (according to Amazon, a super-violent rip-off of Superman) before Moore took over in 1996.  Moore reinvented Supreme as a new revision of the old character who has to travel to his past in order to recover from his amnesia.  As a new version of an old hero, this Supreme doesn’t know about his past, because it’s not his past, but the past of a different Supreme.  As Moore tells the story, the book alternates between sleek and shiny computer-aided graphics and a retro look from the thirties or forties.



Bright Sadness

“A journey, a pilgrimage!  Yet, as we begin it, as we make the first step into the ‘bright sadness’ of Lent, we see–far, far away–the destination.  It is the joy of Easter, it is the entrance into the glory of the Kingdom.  And it is this vision, the foretaste of Easter, that makes Lent’s sadness bright and our lenten effort a ‘spiritual spring.’  The night may be dark and long, but all along the way a mysterious and radiant dawn seems to shine on the horizon.  ‘Do not deprive us of our expectation, O Lover of man!'”

-Alexander Schmemann, Great Lent: Journey to Pascha, p. 15



Tuesday Reading Roundup, Week 7

1. The Absolute Sandman, Vol. 3 by Neil Gaiman–Thankfully, after a somewhat disappointing second volume, this one is possibly as good as the first.  Check your local library, although this is really probably good enough to drop the $60-70 on Amazon.  It makes me hope that whenever they start making films, they do it right.  I vote Guillermo del Toro or Alfonso Cuaron to direct.  Courtney, you should get Max to grab Volume 1 from Lilly Library.  For some reason, I think you might like it.

2. Great Lent: Journey to Pascha by Alexander Schmemann–This thin volume will soon be finished, although I now doubt it will be finished before Lent begins tomorrow.  I feel like I get Lent, but I still don’t get Ash Wednesday.  I’ve still got 10 hours to figure it out, I suppose.

3. Souls on Fire: Portraits and Legends of Hasidic Masters by Elie WieselI haven’t actually started this book, but I randomly hoped that writing down that I was reading it would encourage me to read it.

4. The Lady, the Lover, and Her Lord by T.D. Jakes–Despite some ridiculous phrasing on Jakes’ part, at 25% through, I am surprising myself, but I actually like a lot of what Jakes has to say.  The fact that I have to read this book is what’s great about Dr. Esther Acolatse.  She has you read from all over the place–Karl Barth, the US Council of Catholic Bishops, T.D. Jakes, and the next author.

5. Getting the Love You Want: A Guide for Couples by Harville Hendrix–This is a book along the lines of Men are From Mars, Women are From Venus.  Marriage/Self-help from somebody who is actually a psychologist.  Haven’t begun it yet, but I have to get halfway through by this time tomorrow afternoon (circa 2:14pm).

6. On the Freedom of a Christian by Martin Luther–Short and to the point.  This is, I think, the third time I have had it assigned at Duke.  But I’ve never read it as a work in the virtue ethics tradition, so we’ll see how that goes.



Tuesday Reading Roundup, Week 6

1. Night by Elie Wiesel–As I told Holly last night, I’m not quite sure why I haven’t read this yet.  It’s so short and so good that I read most of it in one sitting last night.  I also have to admit that I thought it was an autobiographical novel and not a memoir.  You’ll notice, as I did, that this is the only non-Christian book I’m reading this week.  That’s part of the reason that I chose to pick it up.  Of course, it still has to do with religion.

2. Great Lent: Journey to Pascha by Alexander Schmemann–Yes, I have started it.  And you will start seeing quotes from it in about a week or so.  I think I’m going to post something Lent-y each week (Wednesdays, maybe?) during Lent.

3. De Trinitate by St. Augustine–Okay, I only have to read chapters 5 and 6.  But, as much as I want to hate Augustine (and I’m not sure why, but perhaps sex and predestination), I love the guy.  I do think, however, (pretentious alert) that he could use some work on his understanding of the Spirit.  Give me more, Augustine, please.

4. Generation to Generation by Edwin H. Friedman–Such a fantastic and wise man.  Tomorrow I’ll give you a lengthy quote to chew on.  Having read less than half of this book, I would recommend it to almost anyone half-interested in psychology, counseling, or their personal interactions with their families.

5. Treatise on the Virtues by St. Thomas Aquinas–Got to love him.  So much brain grinding.  So much grace of God working.

Honorable mention: The Absolute Sandman, Vol. 3 by Neil Gaiman–I put this on here because I doubt I’ll be able to stay away from it this week.  Even though Vol. 1 was much better than Vol. 2, I’m still going to give this an honest try.  The chances of it being read are also helped by the fact that I somehow (!?!?!?!) finished all my school readings for this week today.



Tuesday Reading Roundup, Week 5

Sometimes I find myself planning out blog posts just for the sake of blog posts.  For instance, this afternoon I thought about posting a couple short essays I wrote for Happiness, the Life of Virtue, and Friendship.  Then I realized, “No, that would be boring.”  So I spared you.  Yes, you’re welcome.

1. Planting Missional Churches by Ed Stetzer–You already know some about this book if you read my posts about it last week.  What has been great about reading it is that my imagination has never been fired by the idea of church-planting.  Now it is.  I’m finding that I do find a lot of the ideas exciting and that my imagination has some room to run around in them.  The question in my context now: Why liturgical Anglican churches?  Can such churches truly meet unmet needs in communities in the US?  Again and again, this book points me to the need for a robust ecclesiology (theology of the church) as a prerequisite for church-planting.  I think Stetzer falls short (and I think that’s because he’s Southern Baptist).  I’ll need to hit the books to develop that further.

2. Christians Among the Virtues by Stanley Hauerwas and Charles Pinches–A familiar favorite.  This week–reading about Aquinas.  This has been a really good read and a useful secondary resource.

3. Putting on Virtue by Jennifer A. Herdt–Again, a repeat.  Again, for the same class–Virtue, the Life of Happiness, and Friendship with Hauerwas.  It, too, is a secondary resource for this week’s reading of Aquinas, but I haven’t yet cracked it.

4. Treatise on the Virtues by St. Thomas Aquinas–The man himself arrives.  I’ll be reading this for the next two weeks.  Hopefully all this virtue stuff in my Hauerwas class will start making sense (and coming more directly from the primary sources, something which it has as yet failed to do).  I still remember how confused I was the first time I tried to read Aquinas, with absolutely no instruction as to his organizational method, in undergrad.  Derrida was an easier read.  Now somehow Aquinas doesn’t seem as difficult, at least once I get into the rhythms of his organization.  Of course, the fact that it is Tuesday night and I have yet to start reading probably bodes ill for my finishing the assigned portion for this week.

5. Deliverance by James Dickey–Famous poet writes lauded novel which is made into Burt Reynolds/Jon Voight film.  It’s always annoying to pick up movie tie-in edition paperbacks, but this is a new low–bare-chested Burt is never a good thing.  Four friends set out on a wilderness adventure in north Georgia.  Things go horribly, horribly wrong.

6.  Great Lent by Alexander Schmemann–Okay, so it’s a sham.  I’ll never start it, and I’ll always make it look like I read Orthodoxers.

7. Generation to Generation by Edwin H. Friedman–A modern classic on family systems (is there any other kind of classic on family systems theory?) within church and synagogue.  I’m told it’s good.  I’ll find out tomorrow before class.

And as for tonight?

1. Walk Pru.

2. Finish the rest of Stetzer’s book.

3. Quickly clean up some houseness.

4. Watch a yet-to-be-determined movie with Dave and possible more folks.



Tuesday Reading Roundup, Week 4

My blog traffic has been abysmal these past few days, but my posts have been mostly cheating (videos and prayers–what?!), so I can’t blame anybody but myself.  At least there’s this beloved staple, which I can’t do without a bit of a personal touch.

1. Perspectives On Marriage edited by Kieran Scott and Michael Warren–For tomorrow’s class, I got to read about cohabitation vs. marriage.

  • First was a report on Cohabitation and Marriage by the National [US] Council of Catholic Bishops.  (You can probably guess that on the topic of cohabitation, they’re agin’ it.)
  • Then we moved onto an article by Kieran Scott, “Cohabitation and Marriage as a Life-Process,” in which he describes a history of Christian marriage.  Although his history is abit fuzzy (no real solid dates, for instance) sex after betrothal and before marriage was commonplace and expected in other eras.  He goes on to argue that the current system–no sex before marriage and then flip the sex-is-okay-now switch at the wedding ceremony–is too abrupt of a process.  I would say that he’s right on that count.  I’m just skeptical about his idea of reinstating betrothal today.
  • A couple other articles that I’ll skip over…
  • And finally “Sex, Time, and Meaning: A Theology of Dating” by Jason King and Donna Freitas, in which the authors lament the state of a theology of Christian dating.  They are right that evangelical Christians have a sorry track record.  I can attest to that from the late 90s and early 2000s.  But as much as I hate the mentality of I Kissed Dating Goodbye and others, I think these authors are overly harsh in their reading, to point of distorting those books’ views.  And honestly, I didn’t know it was possible to be too hard on them.

2. Planting Missional Churches by Ed Stetzer–Confusingly, this is the second edition of a book by a different title, Planting New Churches in a Postmodern Age.  I’m not sure what to think about the significance of the fact that this book is listed in many places as basically The Bible of Church Planting, yet Duke Divinity Library has no books at all by the author.  Is that a judgment of the validity of his work?  Or are new churches totally uninteresting to the Christian academy?  Or might the faculty of Duke Divinity and its library have no knowledge of church planting literature?  Let me know if you can think of other possibilities.  At any rate, I have to read it for this month’s Anglican Missional Pastor meeting, Friday next.  (I flipped Friday and next because it’s Anglican, you know.)  I’m hoping that my well-tuned critical unit can keep it down a little bit.

3. Becoming Married by Herbert Anderson and Robert Cotton FiteFor Duke CPE, I already read one book by Anderson, entitled All Our Losses, All Our Griefs.  Despite the cheesy titles of pastoral care literature, it’s really amazing stuff, and I feel entirely illiterate in the area, after five semesters at a top-tier divinity school.  (Perhaps the problem is that I went to a top-tier divinity school.)  But, to the point, this book is awesome.  The title refers to the fact that “becoming married” is a long-term process, not just a ceremony.  All kinds of family systems theory and psychology, which is incredibly helpful, although thus far lacking in theological insight.  One thing that is distinctive is that the authors insist that the personality inventories which are so common in Christian premarital counseling (and beyond?) are very limited in their usefulness.  While such inventories can pick up major incompatibility and personality issues, they fall short, because people entering marriage are often still growing as human beings and certainly in relationship to each other.  More helpful, insist Anderson and Fite, is a genogram, basically an in-depth family tree.  When we can see and discuss our family backgrounds, we can begin to talk better about what the new family will look like.   All this genogram talk makes me want to blog about it, but until then, see what Wikipedia has to say about it.

4. Christians Among the Virtues: Theological Conversations with Ancient and Modern Ethics by Stanley Hauerwas and Charles Pinches–Honestly, the readings I am doing this week were due two and three weeks ago, but I find myself, for the first time ever, having a bit of time to go back and catch up on the stuff I missed.  Huzzah!

5. Great Lent: Journey to Pascha by Alexander Schmemann–Discerning readers may notice that this first appeared two weeks ago, and then disappeared for last week.  That’s because I have yet to start it.  But Lent is also yet to start, so I’m safe.  The problem may be that I have nowhere in my schedule to read this.  As interested as I now seem to be in theology and such, I still can’t see this as “fun reading.”  Probably that’s a good thing.  I’m fine with being odd, but maybe I’ll hold off on that kind of odd.



Tuesday Reading Roundup

1. A Bit on the Side by William Trevor–A book of short stories by an English writer whom I’ve seen compared to Chekhov in several reviews.  All kinds of “best living short story writer in the English language” stuff.  A few years ago I read his novel, Death in Summer, and I have to say that it was awful.  A mystery with no suspense.  I’m really not sure how to describe what went wrong with that novel.  But I’ve complained about it to a few people, and then Mom told me that his short stories are much better.  This is a Christmas gift from her and Dad.  I own far too many unread books, and thus I work to read books that I receive as gifts.  Part of this is because it bothers me when I gift books to people (as I always do, albeit a little tempered by Holly’s helpful wisdom since we’ve been married), and then they never read them.  So, part of my gratitude for this particular gift is to read it as soon as possible.  Lovely short stories here, giving good evidence that you don’t have to have much plot in order to write something gorgeous.  Little wisps of stories and very nice reading.  Especially nice since the short story format works well with the chopped up bits of time I have to read during the semester.

2. Great Lent: The Journey to Pascha by Alexander Schmemann–Okay, so I haven’t yet begun this book.  Part of Tuesday Reading Roundup is to set the reading plan for the week ahead, and starting this book is on the agenda.  Schmemann is an incredibly well-known and well-respected Orthodox scholar.  He is especially known, at least in Protestant circles, for his work on worship and the sacraments.  Why am I reading it now?  Because Lent is not too far in the future, and I just have never gotten Lent.  Might this year be the year?

3. Mimesis by Erich AuerbachActually, I’ll only be reading the first chapter–“Odysseus’ Scar.”  This is for Introduction to Midrash.

4. Reflected Glory: The Spirit in Christ and Christians by Thomas Snail–The title probably explains as much as I could tell you about this book.  I’m reading it for Jeremy Begbie’s Spirit, Worship, and Mission class.

5. Beyond Companionship: Christians in Marriage by Diana Garland and David Garland–A book for Christian Marriage and Family Across Cultures.  All I would note is that the title is important–“Christians in Marriage” not “Christian Marriage.”  Dr. Acolatse, who is teaching the class, insists that the former is a better choice of words.  That might be a separate post sometime, as I’m not yet convinced that she’s right.

6. Perspectives on Marriage: A Reader by Kieran Scott and Michael Warren–Since mentioning this book last week, I actually did read a couple articles–a history of marriage within Judaism and Christianity as well as articles on specifically Protestant theologies of marriage (as this book seems to be Roman Catholic in perspective) as well as Jewish and Muslim understandings of marriage.  This also needs to lead to a separate post at some point on the issue of a Christian standpoint on gay marriage, one based in the history of church-state relationships with the institution of marriage, a history regarding which I at least had not been aware.

7. Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle–As I’m finishing out this time through the work, I’m sure I shall return to it.   Incredibly rich and important, it certainly has earned its status as a classic.

8. Christians Among the Virtues by Stanley Hauerwas and Charles Pinches–You’ll see this a lot from week to week, as it tracks throughought the class I’m taking with Hauerwas this semester–Happiness, Virtue, and the Life of Friendship.

I must say that I’m finishing up this list for the week, it seems a bit daunting.  Losing last Friday to being out of town and today due to the flu is not going to help, either.