The Taser's Edge


Google Readings

Wanted to answer a couple friends who wanted to know what I Google Read.  Aside from news feeds (Wall Street Journal, International Herald Tribune, New York Times, L.A. Times, BBC News, Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor) and friends’ feeds, and not in any order, fifteen blogs which I probably read the most often…

  1. AdFreaks–Blog of AdWeek, with great social commentary on advertising
  2. The Allmusic Blog–Allmusic.com’s blog tells me about music I’ve never heard of with nearly every post.
  3. Boing Boing–What my dream site would be, if I could pull together a dream team of interesting people interested in interesting stuff.
  4. Comixed–Current funny site I return to most often
  5. dotCommonweal–Liberal Catholic politics, religion, and culture
  6. Drawn!–Art, animation, etc., and from Canada!
  7. Episcopal Cafe–Liberal Episcopal\Anglican blog
  8. Faith and Theology–solo theologian/professor (with some guest posts) in Australia
  9. First Things: On the Square–(very) conservative Catholic politics, theology, and culture (with some serious neo-con-ness)
  10. Insight Scoop–ditto on the conservative Catholic-ness, the blog of Ignatius Press
  11. Movie Morlocks–Turner Classic Movies blog
  12. PostSecret–You’ve heard of this already
  13. The Sartorialist–Fashion blog
  14. /Film–Movie news
  15. Theophiliacs–Young group of moderate Anglican bloggers

I’m a fickle reader, so it really varies what I return to from week to week.  These are the current ones.



WeFeelFine.org

As you may have intuited from the title, you should visit wefeelfine.org.  It’s not a perfect program (doesn’t seem to work in Firefox, and it’s fairly slow), but it is really neat.

Them on themselves: “Since August 2005, We Feel Fine has been harvesting human feelings from a large number of weblogs. Every few minutes, the system searches the world’s newly posted blog entries for occurrences of the phrases ‘I feel’ and ‘I am feeling’. When it finds such a phrase, it records the full sentence, up to the period, and identifies the ‘feeling’ expressed in that sentence…The result is a database of several million human feelings, increasing by 15,000 – 20,000 new feelings per day.”

Basically, they give you several ways of looking at the data that they’ve collected, and they can break it down into particular demographics.  My favorite function is Murmurs, which shows sentences that people have written in the last few minutes which their system has picked up.  Kind of sad to watch sometimes.  Kind of a PostSecret feeling to read all of them as they come in.